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Chrome Security Hurdle May Affect Your Website’s Usability

50% of U.S. browser traffic comes from Chrome, which means many site visitors may not be able to view your site properly starting in December.

Google is set to throw a new wrench into how visitors view your company’s website. Starting in December, Google’s Chrome browser will start blocking “mixed content” on secure websites.

Which might sound like confusing jargon, so let’s have some definitions first:

A secure website is one whose address starts with https, rather than just plain http. The “s” means the site is secured by extra coding to deter hackers from intercepting the personal data entered by a visitor to that site. The extra coding also allows your browser to verify that it’s really displaying the website you want to view.

A nonsecure website doesn’t have that extra layer of protection. Google often labels these sites as “not secure” and can even block users from easily reaching the site.

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15 Tips for Better Password Protection

Do not store your passwords or master password in your email, or, on your computer in a text file, even if that text file is password protected.

Password protection is a crucial part of cyber security that not only impacts the security of business websites, but also personal information for anyone using the Internet.

Yet, many of us don’t take it as seriously as we should. The convenience and expediency of using easy-to-remember passwords, or, not changing passwords for a long period of time will, sooner or later, compromise your online security. Despite the risks, we have all been guilty of this.

As hackers continue to become more and more sophisticated in their means of stealing information our risks will continue to increase. Although there is no guarantee of a completely fail-safe solution, there are a number of things that you can do to drastically lower the risk of password theft and the catastrophe that could follow.

  1. Do not use the same password for more than one account login.
    If hackers get ahold of a password from one account, they can get into all of your accounts with that same password.
  2. Use a password manager.
    Use a password manager to help generate secure, random passwords that you won’t have to remember on your own, except for one very secure master password. Once you are logged in with the master password, some password managers will automatically, and securely, fill in your hard-to-remember passwords for you.
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